Is Boris Johnson Guilty of Joint Enterprise?

Children in courtOn 2 November 1952, Derek Bentley was convicted as a party to murder, by the English law principle of common purpose, or joint enterprise. The jury at the trial found Bentley guilty based on the prosecution’s interpretation of the ambiguous phrase ‘Let him have it’.

Today, I believe that Boris Johnson is guilty by the same principle of joint enterprise in the murder of the British and Northern Irish body politic. David Cameron and Theresa May may have fired the bullets which impoverished our education services, enfeebled our health service, crippled our local government, depopulated our police forces, decimated our judicial system of magistrate courts, legal aid and prisons, and, for  the pièce de résistance, introduced the unfair and hopelessly organised (projected finish date 2017, but now expected not be completed before 2023), and expensive (forecast implementation cost £2bn now expected £12bn) Universal Credit system, but Johnson was there in the background saying little, but voting for each measure. Continue reading “Is Boris Johnson Guilty of Joint Enterprise?”

A Really-Smug Story

a really smug story

Once upon a time, or olim as our scholarly protagonist Jacob Really-Smug was prone to say, there was a young country boy living on one side of a large river. From his countryside home he could dimly see in the distance the Big School across the estuary.

Each day he’d walk to his small country school, only to be bullied by the bigger boys because he was a bright teacher’s pet and he wore glasses. He hated games the most. Fearful of getting his knees dirty and scared of being kicked below the belt, he detested football with a passion which far exceeded that with which his classmates supported Rovers or United or Hotspur, the teams on the other side of the river. Worst of all he had to take off his glasses to play, so he was even more disadvantaged in the game. He hated football. Continue reading “A Really-Smug Story”